Info

governmentality

Power, politics and ideas are at the center of this weekly, interview-based podcast with journalist Allen McDuffee.
RSS Feed Subscribe in Apple Podcasts
2018
February
January


2017
December
November
October


2015
October
September
June


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: Page 1

Allen McDuffee of The Atlantic hosts a weekly podcast on power, politics and ideas. Read more of his reporting and learn more about this podcast at governmentality

Feb 13, 2018

Facebook news feed changes are coming after the Silicon Valley giant has increasingly come under fire for having a negative impact on politics and for making the proliferation of fake (and divisive) news that much easier. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said the changes are meant to make everybody “feel more connected and less lonely, and that correlates with long term measures of happiness and health." Publishers are among those bemoaning the changes, but so are Facebook users who say they want control over the network connections and choices they’ve made.

On this episode, I talk to Ethan Zuckerman, the director for the Center for Civic Media at MIT, about Facebook and how their changing your feed. And in the book chat, I speak with Niall Ferguson of the Hoover Institution about his new book on the (very long) history and power of networks, The Square and The Tower.

Listen and subscribe to the governmentality podcast in iTunesGoogle PlaySoundCloudBlubrryStitcher, or anywhere else podcasts are found.

Guests:

Ethan Zuckerman is director of the Center for Civic Media at MIT, and an Associate Professor of the Practice at the MIT Media Lab. His research focuses on the use of media as a tool for social change, the role of technology in international development, and the use of new media technologies by activists. He is the author of Rewire: Digital Cosmopolitans in the Age of Connection. Follow him on Twitter: @EthanZ

Niall Ferguson, MA, D.Phil., is the Milbank Family Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and a senior fellow of the Center for European Studies, Harvard, where he served for twelve years as the Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History. His newest book is The Square and The Tower. Follow him on Twitter: @nfergus

Discussed on the show:

Follow governmentality:

Please take a moment to rate and review the show wherever you listen to podcasts—it really does help others discover our show.

The governmentality podcast was produced and edited by Michele Zipkin. The show’s music was composed and performed by Jeremy Carlstedt.

Jan 30, 2018

President Donald Trump is preparing to deliver his first State of the Union address. But what exactly goes into the making of this annual address? On this governmentality short, I spoke with Jennifer Grossman, CEO of the Atlas Society and former speechwriter for President George H.W. Bush. We discussed the importance of the State of the Union address, the power struggles that make the speech what it is and what the address means from a president who keeps the public updated via Twitter.

Listen and subscribe to the governmentality podcast in iTunesGoogle PlaySoundCloudBlubrryStitcher, or anywhere else podcasts are found.

Guest:

Jennifer Anju Grossman is the CEO of the Atlas Society and a former White House speechwriter under the George H.W. Bush administration. Grossman is a former senior vice president at Dole Food Company and served as director of education at the Cato Institute. Follow her on Twitter: @JenAnjuGrossman

Discussed on the show:

Follow governmentality:

Please take a moment to rate and review the show wherever you listen to podcasts—it really does help others discover our show.

The governmentality podcast was produced and edited by Michele Zipkin. The show’s music was composed and performed by Jeremy Carlstedt.

Jan 22, 2018

Liberalism may conjure up certain political leanings in American society, but its roots are in philosophy that predates the United States and while encompassing the norms, practices and principles of both major political parties and the overwhelming majority of American citizens. Despite this commonality,  liberalism—and its updated version, neoliberalism—may precisely be what's ailing America in terms of persistent racism, rising inequality, and rampant ideological polarization. 

On this episode, I talk to Ryan Cooper, national correspondent at The Week, about neoliberalism and how it’s hurting the Democratic Party. And in the book chat, I speak with Patrick Deneen, a political theorist at the University of Notre Dame about his new book, Why Liberalism Failed.

Listen and subscribe to the governmentality podcast in iTunesGoogle PlaySoundCloudBlubrryStitcher, or anywhere else podcasts are found.

Guests:

Ryan Cooper is a national correspondent at The Week and his work has appeared in the Washington Monthly, The New Republic and The Washington Post. Follow him on Twitter: @ryanlcooper.

Patrick Deneen is the David A. Potenziani Memorial Chair in Constitutional Studies and associate professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame. His new book is Why Liberalism Failed. Follow him on Twitter: @PatrickDeneen.

Discussed on the show:

Follow governmentality:

Please take a moment to rate and review the show wherever you listen to podcasts—it really does help others discover our show.

The governmentality podcast was produced and edited by Michele Zipkin. The show’s music was composed and performed by Jeremy Carlstedt.

Jan 16, 2018

Earlier this month, when Michael Wolff released his book Fire and Fury, a number of bombshell reports broke about how President Trump conducts his business, how staffers routinely badmouth the commander-in-chief, and the mindset that fuels his fast food diet. The risk, of course, is that focus on the gossip of the inner workings of Trump World obscures the long-term repercussions of the administration. But David Cay Johnston’s It’s Even Worse Than You Think: What The Trump Administration Is Doing To America is a different book.

On this governmentality short, we talked about Donald Trump’s disregard of the emoluments clause, the damage being done by what he calls the “political termites” of the administration and his 30 years of covering Donald Trump.

Listen and subscribe to the governmentality podcast in iTunesGoogle PlaySoundCloudBlubrryStitcher, or anywhere else podcasts are found.

Guest:

David Cay Johnston is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist and bestselling author of The Making of Donald Trump. He has lectured on economics, journalism, and tax policy on every continent except Antartica and is a former president of Investigative Reporters & Editors. He has been a frequent guest on television and radio shows and was a consultant on the Netflix series House of Cards.   Follow him on Twitter: @DavidCayJ

Discussed on the show:

Follow governmentality:

Please take a moment to rate and review the show wherever you listen to podcasts—it really does help others discover our show.

The governmentality podcast was produced and edited by Michele Zipkin. The show’s music was composed and performed by Jeremy Carlstedt.

Jan 1, 2018

This week, we return to Down Girl by Kate Manne, Cornell University philosophy professor. It was the subject of last week’s book chat, but the interview was so insightful that producer Michele Zipkin and I decided to publish my interview with her in its entirety. In it, we discussed the complex ways in which misogyny works, the persistent problem of how men are exonerated, how Donald Trump both is and is not a good example of a misogynist, and why this was such a difficult book for her to write.

You can find last week’s episode, Undoing Misogyny, with the New Republic’s Josephine Livingstone and Kate Manne here.

Guest:

Kate Manne is assistant professor at the Sage School of Philosophy at Cornell University and the author of Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny. Before that, she was a junior fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows from 2011 to 2013. She holds a Ph.D. in philosophy at MIT from 2006 to 2011. Follow her on Twitter: @kate_manne.

Discussed on the show:

Follow governmentality:

You can subscribe to the governmentality podcast in iTunesGoogle PlaySoundCloudBlubrryStitcher, or anywhere else podcasts are found.

Please take a moment to rate and review the show wherever you listen to podcasts—it really does help others discover our show.

Big thanks to Bert Odom-Reed and Glen Palmer at the Cornell University Media Relations Office for making the interview possible.

The governmentality podcast was produced and edited by Michele Zipkin. The show’s music was composed and performed by Jeremy Carlstedt.

Dec 19, 2017

The case of Harvey Weinstein and his sexual abuse of women opened the floodgates for the similar revelations in media, entertainment and politics that continue to fill the daily news. And while the reckoning of workplace harassment and assault is certainly a welcome development, there are still some larger political, social and cultural questions that remain unanswered.

On this episode, I talk to Josephine Livingstone, staff culture writer at The New Republic about a path forward for feminism since the Weinstein investigation and the #MeToo movement. And, in the book chat, I’ll speak with Cornell University philosophy professor Kate Manne about her new book, Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny.

Guests:

Josephine Livingstone is staff culture writer at The New Republic. Follow her on Twitter: @Jo_Livingstone.

Kate Manne is assistant professor of philosophy at Cornell University and the author of Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny. Follow her on Twitter: @kate_manne.

Discussed on the show:

Livingstone's "So You Married Your Flirty Boss"

Livingstone's "The Task Ahead for Feminism"

Manne's Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny

Follow governmentality:

You can subscribe to the governmentality podcast in iTunesGoogle PlaySoundCloudBlubrryStitcher, or anywhere else podcasts are found.

Please take a moment to rate and review the show wherever you listen to podcasts—it really does help others discover our show.

The governmentality podcast was produced and edited by Michele Zipkin. The show’s music was composed and performed by Jeremy Carlstedt.

Dec 12, 2017

Before Donald Trump even took office, some of his most vocal detractors were already calling for impeachment. But after nearly a year of political, moral and legal controversies, that number has grown — with several polls showing that as many as half of Americans believe President Trump should be impeached. And that sentiment has been amplified by calls from Capitol Hill and a massive ad campaign by one billionaire — all who want Trump out of the Oval Office.

On this episode, I talk to Jim Newell, staff writer for Slate about the growth in impeachment rhetoric and how Democratic leaders are attempting to tamp that down. And, in the book chat, I’ll speak with Harvard Law School professor Cass Sunstein about his new book, Impeachment: A Citizen’s Guide.

Note: Since my interview with Jim Newell, Rep. Al Green has put an impeachment resolution on the House floor for a vote. It failed by a 364-58 vote.  

Guests:

Jim Newell is a staff writer at Slate covering Congress. His feature article, "Ixnay on Impeachmentay," covers the effort by Democratic leaders to tamp down on impeachment rhetoric within their own party. Follow him on Twitter: @jim_newell.

Cass Sunstein is the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard Law School and the author of Impeachment: A Citizen's Guide. Follow him on Twitter: @CassSunstein.

Discussed on the show:

Rep. Al Green calling for the impeachment of Donald Trump. 

Ezra Klein's recent story: "The case for normalizing impeachment"

Follow governmentality:

You can subscribe to the governmentality podcast in iTunesGoogle PlaySoundCloudBlubrryStitcher, or anywhere else podcasts are found.

Please take a moment to rate and review the show wherever you listen to podcasts—it really does help others discover our show.

The governmentality podcast was produced and edited by Michele Zipkin. The show’s music was composed and performed by Jeremy Carlstedt.

Nov 27, 2017

Last week, a start-up in China said next year it plans to launch taxi drones in Dubai. And it’s just as it sounds—a flying car that will carry passengers in its tiny cockpit. As far fetched as that might sound, from warfare and espionage to photography and pizza deliveries, drones have become a part of our daily lexicon.

But can drones get out of these two lanes of destruction and amusement?

On this governmentality short, I spoke with Shira Efron, policy researcher at the RAND Corporation. We talked about how drones can bring meaningful change to difficult problems in Africa, the obstacles of drones and how that industry can beat its negative reputation.

Guests:

Shira Efron, Ph.D., is an associate policy researcher at the RAND Corporation, a special advisor on Israel with RAND's Center for Middle East Public Policy, and a professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School. You can follow her on Twitter: @ShiraEfron.

Follow governmentality:

You can subscribe to the governmentality podcast in iTunesGoogle PlaySoundCloudBlubrryStitcher, or anywhere else podcasts are found.

Please take a moment to rate and review the show wherever you listen to podcasts—it really does help others discover our show.

The governmentality podcast was produced and edited by Michele Zipkin. The show’s music was composed and performed by Jeremy Carlstedt.

Nov 21, 2017

A wave of Democratic electoral victories, particularly in state legislative seats and governorships, have been said to be a referendum on President Donald Trump. The gained seats may or may not be a sign of what’s to come in the 2018 elections, but the record numbers of individuals who volunteered, donated or otherwise became involved is undeniable.

On this governmentality short, I spoke with Gideon Lewis-Kraus, writer-at-large at The New York Times magazine. We talked about his coverage of one of those races in Virginia where enthusiasm for the Democratic candidate came from well outside his district and how a single campaign manager rode that energy all the way to victory.

Guests:

Gideon Lewis-Kraus is writer-at-large at The New York Times Magazine. His latest piece, “The Resistance Comes to Loudon County,” is in the current issue of the magazine.

Follow governmentality:

You can subscribe to the governmentality podcast in iTunesGoogle PlaySoundCloudBlubrryStitcher, or anywhere else podcasts are found.

Please take a moment to rate and review the show wherever you listen to podcasts—it really does help others discover our show.

The governmentality podcast was produced and edited by Michele Zipkin. The show’s music was composed and performed by Jeremy Carlstedt.

Nov 14, 2017

There is little question that technology brings about change. But how much of it is for the good? At their best, technology giants can save lives. But at their worst, they provide massive audiences for the most of deplorable human behavior. Silicon Valley leaders are quick to celebrate their successes, but often shirk their responsibilities in the eyes of many.

On this episode, we’ll discuss both the successes and responsibilities of Silicon Valley. First, I’ll talk with Derek Thompson of The Atlantic about X, Google secret research wing. And in then in the book chat, I’ll speak with Noam Cohen, former New York Times technology columnist about his new book about Silicon Valley, The Know It Alls.

Guests:

Derek Thompson is senior editor at The Atlantic magazine and author of Hit Makers. Follow him on Twitter: @DKThomp.

Noam Cohen is author of The Know-It-Alls: The Rise of Silicon Valley as a Political Powerhouse and a Social Wrecking Ball. Follow him on Twitter: @noamcohen.

Follow governmentality:

You can subscribe to the governmentality podcast in iTunesGoogle PlaySoundCloudBlubrryStitcher, or anywhere else podcasts are found.

Please take a moment to rate and review the show wherever you listen to podcasts—it really does help others discover our show.

The governmentality podcast was produced and edited by Michele Zipkin. The show’s music was composed and performed by Jeremy Carlstedt.

Nov 7, 2017

Alfred Nobel, the Swedish chemist, engineer and innovator who used his enormous fortune to fund the Nobel Prizes, once said, “If I have a thousand ideas and only one turns out to be good, I am satisfied.”

Today, ideas are all around us. From tiny tweaks to mundane products to popularizing space travel, we are inundated with ideas from more channels than we can count. What used to live firmly in the world of academia and, later, think tanks is now the business of many and broadcast through a plethora of channels like TED talks, ideas festivals and media outlets dedicated to the world of ideas. We’ve become obsessed with this world of innovation, but it’s also come to resemble an industry all its own. On this episode, I talk with Chris Shea, senior editor at vox.com where he edits The Big Idea Section. And in the book chat, I’ll speak with Tufts University professor Daniel Drezner about his book, The Ideas Industry.

Guests:

Chris Shea is a senior editor at Vox.com where he edits The Big Idea section. Follow him on Twitter: @cshea4.

Daniel Drezner is professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and the author of The Ideas Industry: How Pessimists, Partisans and Plutocrats Are Transforming the Marketplace of Ideas. Follow him on Twitter: @dandrezner.

Follow governmentality:

Nov 1, 2017

The number of international migrants world wide has continued to rapidly grow over the past 15 years, reaching nearly 250 million in 2015, according to the United Nations. There's no sign of that slowing down as individuals and families seek economic opportunity and flee environmental and political disaster. In too many cases families and individuals are risking everything—including their very lives—to cross the waters from Africa to Europe or the border from Mexico to the United States. To learn more about the plight of migrants, we turned to Jason De Leon, professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan and founder of the Undocumented Migration Project who works on migration across the U.S.-Mexico border. And in this week’s book chat, we hear from Sasha Polakow-Suransky about his new book, Go Back to Where You Came From.

Oct 24, 2017

President Donald Trump may be unsure of exactly how presidential he wants to be, but what does it mean to "be presidential" anyway? In this episode, we look at Trump's presidential style with Alex Shephard, news editor of The New Republic. And we discuss the changes in the very office itself with University of Texas professor Jeremi Suri, whose new book is The Impossible Presidency. 

Guests:

Alex Shephard is the news editor at The New Republic and you can follow him on Twitter: @alex_shephard.

Jeremi Suri is the Mack Brown Distinguished Professor for Global Leadership, History and Public Policy at the University of Texas at Austin and the author of The Impossible Presidency: The Rise and Fall of America's Highest Office. You can follow him on Twitter: @JeremiSuri.

Mentioned in this episode:

Follow governmentality:

Oct 16, 2015

In this episode of the governmentality podcast, journalist Allen McDuffee talks with Mike Pesca of Slate's The Gist about the power of podcasting, storytelling and humor — and why he wants to be the arbiter of TED Talks. And, in the book chat, Allen talks with Heath Brown about his book, The Tea Party Divided. 

The governmentality podcast is sponsored by Bombfell, the online men's styling and clothing service. Get $10 off today!

To read more about the world of power, politics and ideas, visit governmentality.

Follow Allen on Twitter: @AllenMcDuffee

Oct 5, 2015

In this episode of the governmentality podcast, journalist Allen McDuffee talks with John Hudak of the Brookings Institution about the power dynamics of the 2016 election cycle. And, in the book chat, Allen talks with Kristin Soltis Anderson about her book about millennials, The Selfie Vote. 

The governmentality podcast is sponsored by Bombfell, the online men's styling and clothing service. Get $10 off today!

To read more about the world of power, politics and ideas, visit governmentality.

Follow Allen on Twitter: @AllenMcDuffee

Sep 25, 2015

In this episode of the governmentality podcast, journalist Allen McDuffee talks with John Sides, professor of political science at George Washington University, about why it's okay to ignore the polls at this point in the 2016 election cycle and what those Trump poll numbers really mean. And, in the book chat, Allen talks with Will McCants of the Brookings Institution about his new book, The ISIS Apocalypse. 

The governmentality podcast is sponsored by Bombfell, the online men's styling and clothing service. Get $10 off today!

To read more about the world of power, politics and ideas, visit governmentality.

Follow Allen on Twitter: @AllenMcDuffee

Sep 17, 2015

In this first episode of the governmentality podcast, journalist Allen McDuffee talks with Brooke Gladstone of WNYC's On The Media about the power of the media, the 2016 election cycle and a post Stewart and Colbert world, among other things. And, in the book chat, Allen talks with Arthur Brooks about his book, The Conservative Heart.

The governmentality podcast is sponsored by Bombfell, the online men's styling and clothing service. Get $10 off today!

To read more about the world of power, politics and ideas, visit governmentality.

Follow Allen on Twitter: @AllenMcDuffee

Jun 9, 2015

Political journalist, investigative reporter and blogger Allen McDuffee launches his new podcast on power, politics and ideas. Learn more at www.governmentality.net.

1